E-Newsletters

5 Most Common Reasons For Insufficient Breath Sample or Shy Lung
07-30-2015

 

Evidential Breath Testers (EBT’s) are engineered to automatically capture a breath sample when analyzing for the presence of alcohol. There are two critical conditions which must be met in order for an automatic breath sample to be taken. First, the subject must provide a minimum volume of breath (1200 cc’s of breath for the Alco-Sensor IV and 1350 cc’s of breath for the Alco-Sensor V). Second, the subject must reach a breath flow drop off point. When both conditions occur, the instrument’s fuel cell automatically opens to capture 1cc of breath sample. However, when your subject will not or cannot provide the minimum volume of breath and reach the breath flow drop off point, it is referred to as “insufficient breath sample” or “shy lung”. Here are the most common reasons for “insufficient breath sample” or “shy lung” and ways to overcome it:
EtG Testing for Alcohol Abstinence: Best Practices
07-24-2015

 

The question we are asked most frequently, year after year for 30+ years, is “How long after drinking can alcohol be detected?” The answer we give has always been based on the assumption that a breath alcohol or saliva test device will be used to detect the presence of alcohol in the blood...
2015 DATIA Conference, My Observations
06-29-2015

 

AlcoPro exhibited at the Drug and Alcohol Testing Industry (DATIA) annual conference in Miami, FL earlier this month. For those readers who don’t know about DATIA, the association is primarily focused on workplace drug and alcohol testing, with particular emphasis on the testing required by U.S. Dept. of Transportation regulations.
Three Benefits to Using Scripted Statements in the Drug and Alcohol Testing Process
06-29-2015

 

As an alcohol and drug testing professional the idea of scripted statements may seem unnecessary or even silly. After all, daily interactions with testing subjects should be a natural exchange, not forced or insincere. However, it’s a proven fact that scripted statements delivered to subjects or donors during the drug and alcohol testing process are advantageous for several reasons.